9/11 Memorial Facts | Learn More About the Memorial & Museum

Almost 20 years after the worst terrorist attack in American history, the National 9/11 Memorial Museum has become one of the most visited locations in the city of New York. Even though the main aspects of the attack are well-known, a lot of interesting facts remain undiscovered. The Memorial Museum holds many such facts, waiting to be known by its visitors. We’ve put together some of the most interesting ones about the building that are sure to leave a lasting impression on you. 

9/11 Memorial Facts | Overview

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - 9/11 Memorial Museum

13 Lesser Known Facts About 9/11 Memorial Museum

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - Museum Inside a Piece of History

1. Museum Inside a Piece of History

Hidden in the depths of the building are the original structures of the World Trade Center, making it one of the deepest buildings of its kind, in more ways than one. Guests are taken to the foundation of the WTC through a steel and glass building, while two large steel tridents from the original North Tower are used to support the atrium and the entrance of the museum.  

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - Most of the Museum is Underground

2. Most of the Museum is Underground

Unlike most museums, the majority of this one is underground. There is an entrance ramp that will take you 70 feet to the bottom, opening into a massive empty hall, which was formerly a part of the North Tower. The intentional emptiness is meant to evoke a sense of absence and loss of the victims of the attack.

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - Slurry Wall and Last Column

3. Slurry Wall and Last Column

The Slurry Wall refers to the remains of a wall that survived the 9/11 attacks. It has cleverly been incorporated into the design of Foundation Hall in an attempt to represent survival and determination. Another important artifact, The Last Column, is a 36-foot piece of steel taken from the site cleanup in May 2002. It was the last item to be recovered from the area.

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - Flight 93 Memorial

4. Flight 93

United Airlines Flight 93 was one of the 4 planes hijacked as part of the 9/11 attacks. Tragedy struck as the plane crashed into Somerset County, killing all 44 individuals on board including the hijackers. A memorial was constructed in honor of the victims on a field in Stoystown, Pennsylvania. Parts of the flight are preserved in the 9/11 Museum.

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - Artifacts and Recordings

5. Artifacts and Recordings

More than 10,000 artifacts were collected during the tragedy, however, only about 10% of them are on display for the public. This includes wrecked emergency vehicles, pictures of victims, and moving footage of the attack and its aftermath. The collection also includes over 2,000 oral testimonies and recordings serving as firsthand oral history. 

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - Visitors Can Share Personal Experiences in Voice

6. Visitors Can Share Personal Experiences in Voice

A commendable part of the museum is the ‘Reflecting on 9/11’ section of the gallery, where visitors can go into a video booth and record their memories of 9/11. Each person’s story is stored and eventually becomes a part of the museum’s oral history collection. Some of these are even used for media presentations, often shown to the public. 

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - Largest Man-Made Waterfalls in America

7. Largest Man-Made Waterfalls in America

Above the museum are two of the largest man-made waterfalls in the country, pouring into two large reflecting pools. The pools outline the areas where the North and South Towers formerly stood. Spilling into the square pools at a height of 30 feet, the waterfalls spill much deeper into the holes at the center of the square pools.

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - The Sphere

8. The Sphere

Before the museum was built, a large globe sculpture known as the Sphere or Sphere at Plaza Fountain was located between the twin towers. Sadly, it was damaged during the collapse of the World Trade Center and was eventually moved to Battery Park City nearby. It is the world’s largest monumental bronze sculpture designed by the German artist Fritz Koenig.

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - First-Hand Experiences

9. First-Hand Experiences

Visitors can now gain deeper insights into the tragedy through daily talks and discussions that take place at the museum. Every day at around noon, a staff member at the museum gives a detailed talk about one specific artifact. Additionally, at 4:00 PM every Tuesday, survivors or family members of victims, share their experiences with the public as a part of an initiative called “We Were There.”

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - Free Admission in Museum

10. Free Admission

Every Monday from 3:30 PM to 5:00 PM, the 9/11 Memorial Museum is free to enter. Keep in mind that this happens on a first-come-first-served basis so you may end up waiting a while. You can also download a free audio guide in case you can’t physically make it to the museum. Other than this, a regular admission ticket costs $30 for adults.

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - Fire Truck

11. Fire Truck

One of the larger artifacts at the 9/11 Memorial Museum is the fire truck from the FDNY Ladder Company 3. The truck was badly damaged on September 11th and is now on display at the museum. It was so large that it had to be lowered using a crane into the museum. It was also placed there as a tribute to the 12 firemen from the same company who died on the day of the attack. 

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - Callery Pear Tree

12. Callery Pear Tree

A month after the attack, a badly damaged tree was found at the 9/11 Ground Zero. Its roots were snapped and burned and its branches were broken. After carefully being removed from the rubble, it was placed under the care of the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation for its rehabilitation. After its recovery, the tree was brought back to the 9/11 Memorial, standing strong as a mark of survival and rebirth.

9/11 Memorial Museum Facts - More 9/11 Tributes Around the World

13. More 9/11 Tributes Around the World

The National September 11 Memorial and Museum are only two of many tributes to the victims of 9/11 throughout the country and the world. Steel from the collapse of the World Trade Center has been widely distributed to other memorial sites across the country by The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. 

Visiting 9/11 Museum
You will need to buy tickets to visit the 9/11 Museum. The 9/11 Memorial, however, is free for visits.

9/11 Museum & Memorial Admission Ticket

Free Cancellation
Instant Confirmation
Mobile Ticket
Flexible Duration
Audio Guide
More details +

9/11 Ground Zero Guided Tour with Skip the Line Tickets

Free Cancellation
Instant Confirmation
Mobile Ticket
1 hr. 30 min.
Guided Tour
More details +

Guided Tour of Statue of Liberty, 9/11 Memorial & Wall Street

Free Cancellation
Instant Confirmation
Mobile Ticket
5 hr.
Audio Guide
More details +

New York Explorer Pass - Pick Your Attraction

Free Cancellation
Mobile Ticket
Flexible Duration
More details +

Frequently Asked Questions About 9/11 Memorial Facts

Q. What is the 9/11 Memorial Museum?

A. After the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, a memorial and museum were built in the place where the towers once stood as a tribute to all the lives lost. 

Q. Where is the 9/11 Museum located?

A. The 9/11 Memorial Museum is located at 180 Greenwich St, New York, NY 10007, United States. Find on Maps

Q. Is the 9/11 Memorial Museum open for visits?

A. Yes, the 9/11 Memorial Museum is open for visits.

Q. How can I visit the 9/11 Memorial Museum?

A. You will need to purchase 9/11 Museum tickets to get entry into the museum. The 9/11 Memorial is open to everyone for free.

Q. Can I visit the 9/11 Museum for free?

A. Yes, you can visit the 9/11 Museum for free every Monday from 3:30 PM to 5 PM.

Q. What is inside the 9/11 Museum?

A. Inside the 9/11 Museum, you can explore the different artifacts that were recovered from Ground Zero. You can also listen to oral testimonies of first-hand experiences of the victims. 

Q. How big are the waterfalls at the 9/11 Memorial?

A. Each pool nearly an acre in size, the two pools at the 9/11 Memorial are the biggest man-made waterfalls in America.